It’s no secret that I’m an Apple fanatic. I’ve used Macintosh computers since 1986. I’ve taken apart the Mac 128K to see the developers’ signatures inside the case. There has never been a point where I thought I would have to abandon my favorite platform. During the dark-days of the late 90s, I still knew that using a Mac beat using a Windows machine, no matter the gigahertz difference. Even though Apple’s switch to Intel processors seemed like a slight to us partisans, it was more like the fall of a wall between two former enemies. The time was right.

Back in the 90s, the tech press all but wrote off Apple. Well, actually, a lot was writen about Apple, but it all entailed how Apple should sell off their properties and close shop. When the iMac came out, starting the annoying and inexplicably continuing trend to name everything “iWhatever,” the press began to turn, ever so slightly in Apple’s favor. But old habits die hard, and now that Apple is really on top of their game, the old tech-heads can’t admit defeat. They’re still warning Apple to sell off the hardware business, to merge with Google (nee Sony), to license their software. It’s crazy.

Mostly, they do this for the hits. Apple partisans are a vocal group. We learned how to use the internet shortly after the DEC users, but long before everyone else was on it exchanging Windows viruses via email. We read articles about Apple voraciously, positive or negative, so anything that discusses Apple is going to get a magnitude more hits than not. The best way to get hits is to call Apple users “fanboys.” Also, call anyone who points out illogic arguments and mistakes in your article an “irrational fanboy.”

But bad press or no, Apple is doing pretty well for itself. Before the iPhone came out (grrr… iPhone), the tech press was insistent that Apple better produce one or the company would go down in flames. Now that the iPhone is out, and successful, the tech press is thrilled to warn Apple of its impending doom.

When the rumors about the iPhone surfaced (three years before the actual release date), I wasn’t confident in Apple’s ability to pull it off. In fairness, I am never sure that whatever Apple does is the right thing. I second-guess that company more than the tech press. “iPod?” I said in 2001. “The world really needs another MP3 player?” Anyway, when Apple released the details of the iPhone (6 months before the introduction), I thought that maybe it would be a decent phone. Surfing the web on it, though? Why bother?

Finally, the iPhone was released, and I’m apathetic about it. I’ll wait for the first revision, I said. But when my Nokia died, I rushed out to get one, because I am an Apple fanatic. The experience of the phone is far better than I could have imagined. I’ve used this phone more in two months than I’ve used any other phone. Mostly, that’s because I don’t like to talk to people on the phone, but the iPhone has a camera and web access. Huh. Guess putting a browser on it was a good idea after all.

Anyway, here’s a photo of a place I drove by in Brookhaven town, taken, of course, with my iPhone.

Phoenix Gallery, Brookhaven, NY

  • Katherine

    Phoenix gallery? What do they sell? Lets go there!

  • misterscratch

    You drove through where I live. That whole building used to be part of the bookstore I went to as a kid.

  • Bill Barber

    Hi, I am a member of Team MacNN, running Seti and a few other projects. I think that you should look into using the optimized application on Seti. The instructions and links can be found here. http://faf.homeunix.com/boinc.html You should see a good improvement on your Mac computers. Billy